Did the NFL Punish Ray Rice Justly?

The NFL’s treatment of Ray Rice shows it does not hold truth and justice up as standards for conduct. Instead, like the rest of America, it holds up fairness and knowledge. As a result, the vengeful rule of the mob is ruining football, just like Obama voters are ruining America.

Consider that Ray Rice already admitted to assaulting his fiancé. That’s the truth. He assaulted her. The prosecutors of that jurisdiction did not pursue charges. According to the law, justice was satisfied, and Mr. Rice walked a free man.

But the mob thought that was unfair. They rallied to demand the NFL punish Ray Rice somehow. They asked, “How is it that a running back who hits Mary Jane, a marijiuana cigarette, gets suspended for six games, but a running back who hits Mary Jane, a woman, gets nothing?”

So the NFL acquiesced to the mob. They handed Ray Rice a two game suspension. I ask, was that suspension just? Did Mr. Rice’s contract have provisions in it regarding domestic violence? Did the NFL have already standing policies in place regarding suspensions for domestic violence?

It was arbitrary and set a poor precedent. Remember that the authorities did not prosecute charges against Mr. Rice. However, the NFL wasn’t concerned with justice, it was concerned with quelling the mob.

But then TMZ got it’s hands on the elevator video of him actually hitting her. When the mob saw it, they rallied again. It’s not fair that Ray Rice play football at all!

And so the Ravens terminated Ray Rice’s contract. He lost his living, his income and the means to support the woman he hit, who ended up marrying him. The team is worse off, and the NFL has one fewer high-caliber running back on the field.

How is this additional punishment just? It also punished the victim of Ray Rice’s crime. Worst of all, women who may suffer domestic violence at the hands of NFL players are much less likely to report these crimes if they think it will ruin their livelihood.

What exactly did the TMZ video change? If the two game suspension was an adequate punishment before, what did the video reveal that required the NFL to indefinitely ban Ray Rice?

It didn’t change our concept of the truth. As far as I know neither Ray Rice or his woman denyed what happened. The problem is that the Obama voters who watch the NFL cannot conceptualize the truth.

Read this: “Ray Rice punched his girlfriend.” You conceptualized that information. Now go watch the video of him punching her. You don’t need to conceptualize it anymore. You know he punched her after seeing it so vividly. (JK. You don’t need to actually watch the video.)

The video heightened our knowledge of the event, changing it from conceptual to visceral. Since the mob acts by instinct not intellect, the video unleashed emotion.

Here’s something you guys need to understand. Truth compels justice. But fairness rests until knowledge stirs it up.

You’re asking, “What’s the difference?” Here it is. You can’t change the truth. Things are true weather you know it or not. But you can play around with knowledge by purposefully remaining ignorant or casting doubt unreasonably.

The video took away that wiggle room.

Before the video went viral, the Obama voters of Baltimore could plausibly remain Ray Rice fans. They might doubt the severity of the beating for example. But the video made the knowledge of the crime inescapable. Suddenly they all want to exchange their Rice Ravens jerseys.

To wrap this up, let’s turn to Barack Obama. That mob that demands the NFL be fair demands Obama rule fairly as its king. And so we see Obama play around with knowledge, purposefully remaining ignorant of truth, lest he be compelled to act. Consider his inaction after the Russians shot down the Malysians Airline jet, or when Musilims stormed Benghazi. He’s still getting to the bottom of those issues. The report from the blue ribbon panel is due soon. He will find out what happened! (Someday)

But unlike the NFL, he has no interest in quelling the mob. He stokes the mob.

When the Obama justice department stormed Furgeson, Missouri, they weren’t looking for the truth. The truth might condemn Michael Brown. They were stirring vengence against the cops to dole out some unprecedented, arbitrary punishments.

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