Barack Obama Pogs

April 12, 1992. Where were you?

I’ll tell you where I was. I was in my sixth grade classroom, learning about Pogs. Some of my classmates showed up to school that day with a baggie, filled with little cardboard round things with graphics on them. I said, “Guys, what’s THAT?” And they were like, “Oh Jimmy, these are Pogs.” I said, “Well, what do you do with them?” And they were like, “Oh, it’s a game, you just like, smash them.” And I was like, “You paid for these things?” And they were like, “Yeah. They’re COOL.”

Fast forward one week later to April 19, 1992: when I showed up to school with a baggie filled with Pogs that I paid for with my own money. And my friends were like, “Jimmy, Pogs aren’t cool anymore.” And I was like, “Guys, just yesterday you were playing with Pogs, and today they’re not cool?” And they were like, “Yeah. We have snap bracelets now.”

The point is, I learned a very valuable lesson about life. As quickly as something comes in is as quickly as it goes out. This applies to any fad, any idea, anything that’s cool.

That’s why with my website, feedingjimmy.com, I don’t put any of my viral videos on here. I have a very slow and steady progress. It’s taken two years for me to get to where I am. And … well, this might not be the best example.

But this applies to a lot of things. For example, where were you on July 27, 2004? I’ll tell you where I was. I was at a security checkpoint in my truck on the Southeast Expressway in Boston. The Democratic National Convention was in town. And on that night, a hitherto unknown state senator from Illinois was delivering the keynote address. His name: Barack Obama. And when he delivered that address, the people there all looked at each other. And they said, “This is it. He’s the one. He’s going to be the president.” On that one day, July 27, 2004, they decided he was going to be the next president.

Remembering what I learned about life from Pogs: when will that one day come when Barack Obama is not “the one”, when he’s not “it”, when he’s not “cool”. I’m gonna make a bold prediction right here. I’m gonna predict that TODAY is that day. September 6, 2012.

Today, Barack Obama is going to deliver the keynote address at the DNC in Charlotte. And for the first time, the people listening are going to notice that this guys isn’t such a great orator. He has a very predictable manner in delivering his speeches. He looks left, he looks right, he looks down, he looks up. He looks left, he looks right, he looks down, he looks up. He has a honky voice. And a gopher lisp. If a word ends in S, it’s going to ring in your ears. And he has a lot of vocal fry too. These things kind of get on my nerves.

But the point is that, for the first time, people are going to notice that. That’s tonight. Those same people who said back in 2004, “This is it. He’s the one,” those same people are going to look at each other and say, “What’s the deal with this guy? He’s no good. These speeches are so boring. I’m tired of him. It’s over. Let’s move on to somebody else.”

As quickly as something comes in is as quickly as it goes out.

On September 28, 1960, it was Ted Williams last day at Fenway Park. Yes, he hit a home run. In the stands there were only a few thousand people. But if you talk to old timers, die-hard Red Sox fans, you will meet tens of thousands of people who all claim to have been there (which is amazing, given the official attendance record).

In the 2004 November elections, 69,456,897 people voted for Barack Obama. In a few years time, I boldly predict that it will be difficult to even find a few thousand people who will admit to having voted for Barack Obama.

Related posts:

Comments are closed.